DevOps Development Pipeline Success Practices

DevOps Development Pipeline Success Practices

Zenergy’s DevOps experts David Dang and Bryson Osborne, and senior test engineer Jonathan Diaz discuss the quality gates, stages, and success practices to include in your DevOps development pipeline. “It is really critical not only to build code, in a continuous fashion, but you also want to build code with quality. Static code analysis, unit testing, code coverage, and post deployment testing are all stages that should be included in your pipeline to ensure your code has quality when building the pipeline and deploying it.” – David Dang, VP of Automation Solutions

DevOps Wheel of elements

Five Common DevOps Pitfalls & How to Avoid Them

Zenergy’s experts have been helping companies optimize modern software delivery methods well before DevOps became a buzzword. Every time we help a client improve their modern software delivery capabilities, we refine our playbook. What works well for one client, may not be the best solution for another. Every solution needs to fit the culture, the teams’ work style, and the software release goals of the organization.

CICD Pipeline Stages

CICD Pipeline Stages: Building a Mature DevOps Pipeline

Zenergy’s DevOps experts David Dang and Bryson Osborne, and senior test engineer Jonathan Diaz discuss the central stages of a mature DevOps CI/CD pipeline. “Many companies have built out a DevOps CICD pipeline. But, is it a mature pipeline? When creating your pipeline, there are several stages you will want to include to ensure it is mature. The goal is to automate as much as possible, running from a trigger base all the way to the last stage of your pipeline.” – David Dang, VP of Automation Solutions

sheriff badge that reads quality assurance (QA) on it

A Case for Quality… We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ QA

After 20 years in quality assurance, I’m still surprised to hear about companies that don’t have formal QA processes. Even more surprising are the companies that say having a QA function is not necessary. Maybe they are a newer tech company with a tiny, tight-knit development team and the software complexity hasn’t reached a level where defects reach a critical mass or perhaps the company doesn’t support a formal process even though it’s happening in some manner. For me, it is akin to saying breathing is not necessary.